Cannelton (Ind.) Reporter

Published February 21, 1862No Date

No Date

General Nelson's brigade passed this point on Tuesday morning.  So great a number of steamers at our landing, at one time we never before seen; it looked very much like New Orleans, before the blight of treason cursed that city.  Gen. Nelson we learn got very much excited because there was not sufficient coal on Capt. Newcomb's wharf-boats, and allowed himself to do and say many things of a highly objectionable character.  Our citizens can all bear testimony that Capt. Newcomb has done all in his power to supply, the extraordinary demand for coal; he desired his men to work on Sunday, and advanced the price of digging; but few men worked on that day, but that was no fault of Capt. Newcomb.  These facts fully and completely exonerate the Capt. from all blame in the matter, and entitles him to the esteem of all who desire to see the vast number of men now concentrating at points below hastened forward.  We know nothing of Gen. Nelson, but if he is worthy of the position he now occupies he will lose no time in making the amende honorable to Capt. Newcomb for his offensive conduct and language while at our landing.

DEMOCRATIC PHAROS – LOGANSPORT, IND.

February 26, 1862 

FROM THE 46TH REGIMENT

CAMP NEAR ELIZABETHTOWN, KY.

Feb. 15, 1862

Dear Pharos: - On the 13th we received orders from Gen. Nelson to strike tents and be prepared to march the next morning.  At 3 o’clock the troops were called and at four breakfast was eaten; at half-past five the tents were struck, and packing commenced in good earnest; at 7 o’clock the Regiment was formed and the 19th Brigade, consisting of the 41st Ohio, 46th Indiana, 47th Indiana, and 6th Kentucky, moved off in the order above named.  Snow had fallen on the night previous which made packing very disagreeable, but all hands seemed highly pleased to leave a camp which was telling so fearfully upon the health of the Regiment.  Our sick list had been constantly augmenting and had already run up to 140, besides the deaths in camp were becoming too frequent.

Where we were to move had been kept a profound secret.  No one believed we should follow the other brigades to Green river, knowing the enemy had deserted Bowling Green.  Not a man, not excepting the colonels, had any other idea but we should retrace our steps and march to New Haven, there take the cars for Louisville, and descend the Ohio.  You can judge then of the general disappointment when the head of the column was turned in the direction of Green River and the forward march commenced.  We followed the pike for about two miles, when we were again disappointed.  Here we left the pike upon a dirt road and marched in the direction of the Ohio River.  The roads after leaving the pike were almost impassable for man or beast.  The snow which had fallen the night previous now began to melt and only added to the depth of mud.  No kind of order could possible be observed, and by common consent every one seemed to be for himself with the understanding that “the Devil was to take the hindmost.”  Never did poor fellows work harder or more patiently to pack their loads through the stuff mud.  It was no uncommon thing to see a soldier pull his leg out of the mud, where it had went knee deep, minus a shoe.  One poor fellow belonging to the 6th Kentucky after struggling through the mire for about four miles fell dead. – After he fell his Captain went to him, supposing he had fainted, and upon turning him over found the spirit had taken its flight.  After two miles further on, one of the members of Co. F of the 46th fell in a fit.  He was taken care of.

It was no uncommon thing to see men lying in fence corners perfectly exhausted.  I saw one poor fellow belonging to the 41st Ohio lying by the wayside, the tears falling down his cheeks and actually overcome with the idea that his capacity for endurance as a Soldier was compromised.

We expect to take the pike tomorrow and go to the Ohio river.  As we marched 18 miles over one of the worst roads in this or any other State on yesterday, we think we can make it.  We are under the impression that Paducah is the point we are making.

The Brigades which went to Green River a few days since, have retraced their steps and are encamped a few miles in our rear.  Their destination no doubt is the same as ours.

When we left Camp Wickliffe, many of our sick who were convalescing desired very much to be with the Regiment, but it is fortunate for them that they were ordered to remain until proper conveyance could be provided.

I hear of several resignations in the 46th but it affords me pleasure to say that in no case is it on account of our Field Officers.  I think I know the sentiment of the Regiment in relations to the officers, and but one feeling exists.  A few came with prejudices who are not loudest in their praise.

We did not see any great outbursts of enthusiasm for the Union in any of the county seats we pass, but we hope there is more devotion felt for the country of Washington, than appears upon the surface.

When our tents are again pitched you may expect to hear from CAMP.

P.S.  Sent the Pharos to 46th Ind. Regiment, unless you know certain where we turn up.

 HUNTINGTON (Ind.) DEMOCRAT

January 23, 1862

Letter from the 47th Regiment

 Camp Wickliffe No. 2

13 Miles S. W. of New Haven, Ky.

Dear Winters – Agreeable to promise, I continue my correspondence.  We left Camp Wickliffe, Bardstown, on the 29th ult. moving in a south west direction, toward New Haven.  After marching a distance of six miles, we cam to a halt in a beautiful grove, which abounded in oak and evergreens, of spruce and cedars, with , now and then a tall pine intervening which made everything appear pleasant and comfortable.  We pitched tents and halted until morning, when we stuck tents and advanced three quarters of a mile further south on the Louisville and Nashville pike.  The required distance was made in about half an hour and we camped in an open field of about 25 acres, in company with Col. Fitch’s 46th, and Col. Caun’s 58th Indiana regiments.  By order of Gen. Wood, this camping ground was in honor of the Governor of Indiana, named Camp Morton.  We remained here until Sunday the 5th of January, when after receiving a few remarks from our Chaplain, in the forenoon, and few they were, as the weather was cold and disagreeable, and our Chaplain being a man of Christian fortitude, and feeling an interest in the welfare of his hearers dismissed us after a few short and pointed remarks on the occasion, by prayer, and a benediction. No sooner had we gained our quarters than we got orders to draw 5 days’ rations, and get ready for our next advance which would take us under General Nelson’s Division.  On the 8th, at 8 o’clock in the morning, we were all called into line and ready for the advance – the 46th regiment taking the lead, one hour ahead of us. – The roads look just frozen hard enough to make it comfortable traveling for those that were well.  Not feeling well, I did not know whether to take the reverse route and go to Bardstown to the hospital, or to try and make the day’s march in company with the rest of the boys.  Picking up courage, I concluded I would rather than go back, try the pace of Col. Crockett, and go ahead, and go ahead I did to the tune of 13 miles, when we came to a halt, after the leaving the 46th one mile in the rear, a distance of four miles north of New Haven.  We had the pleasure of camping on the very spot of ground which is claimed as the birthplace of our Chief Magistrate.  The place is entirely surrounded by hills, called the Muldroy Knolls.  The ground on which we remained over night had a very gradual descent, with a sparking stream of water running through it, and emptying in what is called Rolling Fork, about 21 miles north of this place.  This camp was named by our colonel, camp Lincoln, in honor of the President.  After a night’s rest, we struck tents and marched to our present location, 8 miles farther south – having considerable of an ascent to make to reach the top of the mountain, along a route romantic and picturesque in the extreme.  We were assigned a position in the woods which is thickly timbered with red oaks and underbrush; the different companies having to do their own underbrushing.  We had scarcely pitched our tents when some the boys of the 34th regiment; of the “Tiger” company, came to see us.  The next day the old “Tiger” himself visited our Quarters and presented us with a lot of cigars, and Lieut. Warner came in shortly afterwards with a bottle of sorghum; such as our friend Blackburn used to furnish to rinse down cigars with, which I can assure you was highly appreciated by the boys in company F.  Long may the tiger of the 34th, and all his cubs live to enjoy themselves.

I think I am safe in saying that the 47th is a left flanking regiment under General Hazen, 19th Brigade, which is composed of the Ohio 41st, Kentucky 6th, Indiana 43rd and 47th.  We are within 18 miles of Green river, under Gen. Nelson’s Division, with 10,000 men, and 10,000 on the road between this and Bardstown.

Yours, P. D. Caverly.

HUNTINGTON (Ind.) DEMOCRAT

January 23, 1862

Letter from the 47th Regiment

 Camp Wickliffe  No. 2

13 Miles S. W. of New Haven, Ky.

                         WintersAgreeable to promise, I continue my correspondence.  We left Camp Wickliffe, Bardstown, on the 29th ult. moving in a south west direction, toward New Haven.  After marching a distance of six miles, we came to a halt in a beautiful grove, which abounded in oak and evergreens, of spruce and cedars, with, now and then a tall pine intervening which made everything appear pleasant and comfortable.  We pitched tents and halted until morning, when we stuck tents and advanced three quarters of a mile further south on the Louisville and Nashville pike.  The required distance was made in about half an hour and we camped in an open field of about 25 acres, in company with Col. Fitch’s 46th, and Col. Caun’s 58th Indiana regiments.  By order of Gen. Wood, this camping ground was in honor of the Governor of Indiana, named Camp Morton.  We remained here until Sunday the 5th of January, when after receiving a few remarks from our Chaplain, in the forenoon, and few they were, as the weather was cold and disagreeable, and our Chaplain being a man of Christian fortitude, and feeling an interest in the welfare of his hearers dismissed us after a few short and pointed remarks on the occasion, by prayer, and a benediction. No sooner had we gained our quarters than we got orders to draw 5 days' rations, and get ready for our next advance which would take us under General Nelson's Division.  On the 8th, at 8 o'clock in the morning, we were all called into line and ready for the advance – the 46th regiment taking the lead, one hour ahead of us. The roads look just frozen hard enough to make it comfortable traveling for those that were well.  Not feeling well, I did not know whether to take the reverse route and go to Bardstown to the hospital, or to try and make the day’s march in company with the rest of the boys.  Picking up courage, I concluded I would rather than go back, try the plan of Col. Crockett, “ go ahead,” and go ahead I did to the tune of 13 miles, when we came to a halt, after the leaving the 46th one mile in the rear, a distance of four miles sorth of New Haven.  We had the pleasure of camping on the very spot of ground which is claimed as the birthplace of our Chief Magistrate.  The place is entirely surrounded by hills, called the Muldroy Knolls.  The ground on which we remained over night had a very gradual descent, with a sparkling stream of water running through it, and emptying in what is called Rolling Fork, about 21 miles north of this place.  This camp was named by our colonel, camp Lincoln, in honor of the President.  After a night's rest, we struck tents and marched to our present location, 8 miles farther south – having considerable of an ascent to make to reach the top of the mountain, along a route romantic and picturesque in the extreme.  We were assigned a position in the woods which is thickly timbered with red oaks and underbrush; the different companies having to do their own underbrushing.  We had scarcely pitched our tents when some the boys of the 34th regiment; of the ‘Tiger’ company, came to see us.  The next day the old ‘Tiger’

himself visited our Quarters and presented us with a lot of cigars, and Lieut. Warner came in shortly afterwards with a bottle of sorghum; such as our friend Blackburn used to furnish to rinse down cigars with, which I can assure you was highly appreciated by the boys in company F.  Long may the tiger of the 34th, and all his cubs live to enjoy themselves.

            I think I am safe in saying that the 47th is a left flanking regiment under General Hazen, 19th Brigade, which is composed of the Ohio 41st, Kentucky 6th, Indiana 43rd and 47th.  We are within 18 miles of Green river, under Gen. Nelson’s Division, with 10,000 men, and 10,000 on the road between this and Bardstown.

                                                Yours,                                                           

                                                     P. D. Caverly.

THE HUNTINGTON (Ind.) DEMOCRAT

FEBRUARY 27, 1862

Letter from the 47th

 Paducah, Ohio River,

 February 23, 1862

Dear Democrat – Here we are taking orders from General Halleck for [?] movements.  We left Camp Wickliffe on the 14th last, and after three days hard marching, made the Ohio river and embarked aboard of the steamers comprising our fleet, nineteen in number, and occupying one day to accomplish the distance of one and a half miles and our troops safely aboard of the steamer.  We left West Point about 10 o’clock on the 17th, and moved down the river as far as Evansville, where we [?] came to, and remained there until morning, when we received orders to ‘about ship’ and retreat up to the mouth of the Green river – a distance of 12 miles.  After lying at Green river over night, we received orders to keep on up the Ohio to our starting point at the mouth of Salt river.  After proceeding as far up as Cannnelton, where we took over we were again ordered down the river to Paducah, which point we reached about daylight this (Friday) morning.  There in a boat lying here with about 250 wounded, from the siege of Ft. Donaldson.  Our boys see the stars and stripes wave over some of the buildings, may they wave there henceforth forever.

How long we will remain here it is impossible for me, ‘or any other man,’ to say; but I do not believe we will remain here long.  You may expect to hear of some great deeds of valor from the boys of the 47th and 34th, for I know when the come to be weighed in the balance they will not be found wanting.

Our boys had the pleasure of seeing for the first time, this morning, a gunboat, of a rather small class, mounting only three guns on a side.

Two boys of the 34th I understand, were drowned since we have been on the river.  I did not learn their names.

Our boys are all in good health and spirits, and eager for the dance.

Yours,

P.D.C.

INDIANAPOLIS DAILY JOURNAL

January 17, 1862

Letter from Bardstown

Camp Wickliffe, Larue Co., Ky.

January 12, 1862

Ed. Journal:  We have made no forward movement since I wrote you last, except in the military improvement of our men.  Col. Hazen, the commander of our brigade, believes in thorough preparation.  With Col. Slack at the head, all our staff, with the Captains and Lieutenants, are drilled every day.  They have lessons assigned them each day in the tactics of war, and every night they are assembled as a school of instruction, and go through a regular recitation.  Considerable emulation has been excited among them, and both officers and men are greatly benefitted by the system.

Col. Hazen is rigid in discipline, and yet a mild and gentlemanly commander.  Having been religiously trained, he honors his training by a genuine respect of morality and Christianity.  By repressing vice and profanity he very properly thinks he can increase the efficiency of his brigade.

He was invited to our headquarters yesterday, to attend a dinner given by Lieut. Col. Robinson.  The dinner “came about” in this wise:  The father-in-law of Col. Robinson, Mr. Ballard, of Knightstown, was entrusted with a box of provisions to bring to Camp Wickliffe.  On arriving at Louisville, he called on Gen. Buell, and requested a pass to our division of the army.  The General very politely sent him back home, but forwarded the box.  The box reached its destination, and when the Lieutenant Colonel opened it, his good wife had put everything to remind him of a Thanksgiving dinner at home.  There were nice biscuits and bread, and two rolls of golden butter, a fine boiled ham, a turkey just read to be carved, two chickens, cheese, tomatoes, pickles, pound cake and white cake, and “round” cake two layers deep, and canned cherries and peaches, with two quarts of the richest kind of cream.  Of course there was plenty for a table full.  Extemporizing a table and a table cloth, and spreading out the plentiful supply, Col. Robinson, with Col. Hazen, Capt. Updyke, Lieut. Col. Cotton, of the 6th Kentucky regiment, Col. Slack, Maj. Mickle, Quartermaster Nichol, Mr. Lemon, and myself, as invited guests, sat down to enjoy the good cheer before us.  Craving the Devine blessing, with humble and thankful hearts, we discussed the dinner with hearty appetites.  It was one of the pleasantest camp “episodes” we have had since we entered the service.  Voting our thanks to Mrs. Robinson for her handsome entertainment, we went to our respective quarters, wondering when such another occasion would call us together.

Mr. Ballard will no doubt be glad to learn that the good things he started with were well disposed of, even though Gen. Buell sent him back to Indiana.

Gen. Nelson, who has been quite unwell, is to-day much better.

The resignation of Col. Steele, and the request that Dr. Ryan would take his place, have probably been published in your columns. – Many of the friends of Col. Steele hoped he would lead the regiment on to Tennessee.  He will carry back with him the kind regards of a large portion of his men

The sight of a JOURNAL in the 47th would be good for sore eyes.  I will write you again, as we draw nearer the great enemy of Kentucky.

Yours truly,

Samuel Sawyer, Chaplain 47th  Regiment

INDIANAPOLIS DAILY JOURNAL

 January 14, 1862

Letter from the 34th Regiment 

Camp Wickliffe, Ky., 

Jan. 9, 1862

Ed. Journal:  The current of events in this department indicates that the time for the grand movement of the army here is close at hand.  There are at present, here and on the road to New Haven, at least fifteen thousand troops, and bone and sinew of the West, waiting for the order to hurl themselves against the hordes of Buckner.  Better material for an army – men possessing more of the physical and moral elements which make good soldiers – never took the field in defense of any cause; under the leadership of such a General as Nelson, it would be safe to wish an engagement with double the number of men.  Nelson is one of the strictest military men of the day, yet his men will eventually

see that it is better to be strict than otherwise.

Col. Fitch’s brigade joined us yesterday, and is encamped in our rear.

The last two weeks have been very disagreeable, and the poor soldiers do nothing but stay in their tents, amusing themselves in various ways.  Some are writing to loved ones at home, some reading, and all doing something to make time pass lightly by.  We have fireplaces and furnaces built in every tent, which makes it very comfortable inside.

I suppose you know by this time of the removal of Major Wilson.  We all loved the Major, and regretted to see him leave us.  I think it will be hard to find a man who will gain the good will of the regiment so effectually as he did. 

Yours truly,
JOHN HARDESTY

INDIANAPOLIS DAILY JOURNAL

February 17, 1862

Letter from Bridgeland’s Cavalry.

 Camp Wickliffe, 

Feb. 9, 1862, 

12 Miles above Munfordsville, Ky/

Ed. Journal:  By some mistake, my last letter was dated “seven miles below Munfordsville,” and in “Gen. Wilson’s” brigade.  It should have been read Gen. Nelson’s division.  We are still encamped at the same place we first pitched our tents, but have extended our picket lines about twenty miles above and ten miles below the National road, up and down the river.  Not a day passes but we bring in from one to five rebel sympathizers, caught in the act or strongly suspected of being in communication with the rebels encamped about five miles from us on the other side of the river.  The river has been so much swollen since we came here, that it would be dangerous to cross, and the rebels have taken advantage of the high water to fell trees across the roads centering at this point, and they have also constructed large timber rafts and sent them adrift, no doubt with the intention of breaking the Pontoon bridge, and damaging the railroad bridge at Munfordsville.  Every day we get sight of their scouts and pickets, but at such a distance that our carbines will not reach them.  We are all anxious to hear the “order” to cross the river and take up quarters on the other side, for we then could get a closer view, and make them lead us a chase that would decide the superiority of Indiana horses.  The other regiments composing this division, are not encamped about twenty miles above us, near New Haven, and we learned that they will be down here this week, and take up their position at this point.

Col. Bridgland has been very sick, and has gone to Indiana, leaving the regiment in command of Major McCook.

We have received here a circular addressed to Gov. Morton, by some one signing himself John Fahnestock.  If the author of the circular could have been here when it was read in our company, he would have received striking proof of the confidence reposed in Gov. Morton by the volunteers of Indiana.  Among all who read it, I heard but one sentiment, that of pity and contempt for the author, His allusions to “Co. ,” meaning, without doubt, our gallant colonel of the 2d Indiana cavalry, only excited the risibilities of the soldiers of the stupidity and “freshness” of his charge.  Such “circulars” will never injure Gov. Morton in the estimation of his soldiers, for they have had too may convincing proofs of fidelity and watchful care to believe one word of his dishonesty.

If we should move over to “Dixie,” you may hears from me again.  Letters to this regiment should be addressed to Camp Wickliffe, via New Haven, Ky.  if they are sent to New Haven direct, they lie over too long.  We receive your paper occasionally.

Yours,

“Co. F.”


 




      

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